Crossroads

When two or more motorists facing each other wish to turn right from a major road into a minor road, there are two different options for positioning prior to the turn. Every other aspect of the turn is the same as normal: use the MSPSL and LADA routines.

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Nearside to nearside
Nearside refers to the side of the vehicle which is nearest to the kerb in normal driving. With the nearside to nearside method, the nearsides of both vehicles are facing each other as the vehicles turn.

The main advantage of this method is that space is maintained between the two vehicles. This method has the further advantage of allowing a number of vehicles to form a queue while waiting to turn.

The major disadvantage of turning nearside to nearside is that each motorist's view of the road ahead is limited by the vehicle in front. This is especially true when faced with a large vehicle such as a bus or van. Be careful to ensure you are aware of any road users, including cyclists and motorcyclists, who may be approaching from beyond the vehicle in front.

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Offside to offside
Offside refers to the side of the vehicle which is furthest from the kerb in normal driving. With this method, the offsides of both vehicles are facing each other as the two vehicles turn.

The offside to offside method has the advantage of allowing a clear view of oncoming traffic.

The main disadvantage is that the two vehicles have to get very close to each other. This can make it difficult to turn, especially when the other vehicle is not turning at the same time.

The offside to offside method has become less common as the roads have become busier. However, always be on the lookout for other road users attempting to use this method. It is not unusual for this technique to be used on quiet roads, particularly in rural areas. Remember, if you can use the offside to offside method, your view of the road ahead will be much better and your turn may be safer as a result.


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